HDM

A look back at the lost streets of Hull

As with any city, Hull’s landscape is constantly evolving. With City of Culture regeneration helping to instigate a raft of new developments and buildings, old sites and sights have made way. But of course, Hull’s history means much of the city is unrecognisable from 100 years ago thanks to the Blitz and the vast swathes of housing being removed by the Hull Corporation Department of Health. We take a step back in time and look at some of the lost streets of Hull.

 

Brighton Street

Brighton Street ran from Hessle Road parallel to Liverpool Street and backed on to the railway line. It was a densely populated community with many of the families serving the fishing industry to the west of the city. Today the site stands underneath the A116 between Hessle Road and Clive Sullivan Way.

 

Broadley Street

Broadley Street ran from Parliament Street, past Burlington Tavern, across the top of Manor Street and up to Leadenhall Square. The street was full of warehouses, sailmakers, and wine, spirit and tobacco stores. The street was done away with in 1901 when Alfred Gelder Street was laid out. Henry Broadley was born in 1793 and was a member of the Conservative party who sat in the House of Commons between the years 1837 and 1851. He was a member of the Hull Broadley family, who consisted of merchants, bankers, landowners and was the first chairman of the Hull and Selby Railway Company.

 

Collier’s Street

Situated off Ferensway and running alongside Hull’s Paragon Station, the street was perhaps best known as being where the infamous Blue Box stood. Joseph Collier was a property dealer and owned houses where the street was laid in 1828.

 

Garden Street

Garden Street
Garden Street

Situated between Spencer Street and Brooke Street, Garden Street ran from Portland Street and was intersected by North Street. It was a mixture of lower class houses and was eventually considered unfit for habitation by the Department of Health. The street was demolished and later replaced with Ferensway.

 

Kent Street/Beeton Street

Post-war redevelopment in East Hull meant several streets were lost when Reckitt’s expanded. Among the streets to vanish from the Hull maps were Beeton Street, Kent Street, and Hume Street. Kent Street and Beeton Street ran from Holderness Road, opposite Cornmill Hotel, and were erected on land owned by land dealer James Beeton. He also had properties on land in west Hull on land that he bought in 1858 which covered 23 acres and was described as a “dismal swamp” and a “perfect quagmire”.

 

King Street

King Street ran from Charles Street at the western end towards the junction of Caroline Street and Worship Street and in a straight line with Sykes Street. The street was a mixture of housing with shops at either end but was lost for the creation of the A165 Freetown Way.

 

Mytongate

Mytongate ran from Castle Street, at the west end, along to Market Place. It was a street that was jam-packed with warehouses, offices, shops, public houses, and hotels.

Changing times are perfectly reflected in these two pictures showing work progressing on the roundabout which now connects Ferensway with Hessle Road and Castle Street, taking in the old Mytongate.
Changing times are perfectly reflected in these two pictures showing work progressing on the roundabout which now connects Ferensway with Hessle Road and Castle Street, taking in the old Mytongate.

It took its name from being the principal road to the hamlet of Myton. Myton meant “farm where rivers meet,” in this case being the River Hull and Humber. During the 18th century, the road was described as being “open and airy”.

 

Waller Street

Located in east Hull, running from Holderness Road on the southern side, Waller Street was once a busy and densely populated part of the city. However, by the end of the war, the area had descended into a sorry state. It remained until Mount Pleasant Retail Park was built – today the street is the shopping area’s car park.

 

Waterworks Street

Waterworks Street ran from Paragon Street, at the west end, down to Queen Victoria Square. Sadly, the southern side was demolished to make way for the City Hall, built between 1903 and 1909, and the northern side was destroyed by the Blitz.

Paragon Street in the days it was known as Waterworks Street.
Paragon Street in the days it was known as Waterworks Street.

The street was then widened post-war and the new offices and shops built on the northern side. Today the site has been renamed on the maps as Paragon Street.

 

Read the full article here

Mortgage Advice Hull

Money Man mascot Related Articles...

Open & Honest Mortgage Advice in Hull

Hullmoneyman.com & Hullmoneyman are trading styles of UK Moneyman Limited, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

UK Moneyman Limited registered in England, registered number 6789312 and registered office 10 Consort Court, Hull, HU9 1PU.

The Financial Conduct Authority does not regulate most buy to let mortgages.

Your home may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

We normally charge a fee for mortgage advice; however, this will be dependent on your circumstances, our typical fee is £599.

Your Rights | Privacy Statement